Console, Games

‘Construction Simulator 2’ Brings the Jank to the Nintendo Switch

This is something I never understood, but there’s a huge scene around “simulator” games. Farming, fishing, trucking, and of course construction. They sell like pancakes, and they’re even popular enough to have their own competitive scene.

I’ve never played any serious simulator games, save for that time I played some Goat Simulator on my phone, and that’s a parody of the entire genre, among others.

Bridging the Construction Gap on the Nintendo Switch

Construction Simulator 2 is now on Nintendo Switch, and if you’re a die hard fan of building highways, skyscrapers, and more, then you can indulge your building fantasies on the go.

Originally a popular mobile game, this Nintendo Switch port of Construction Simulator 2 will provide fans with ample opportunity to put their building skills to test on Nintendo’s platform, by offering access to more than 40 originally licensed and faithfully recreated construction vehicles and machines by world-renowned manufacturers and brands.


You’ll also get 60 challenging construction jobs: from excavation missions, the delivery of construction materials, the steering of gigantic tower cranes, the pouring of concrete up to the asphalting or refurbishment of roads in the fictional US state of Westside Plains.

So, How Does it Play?

Pretty good, actually!

Controls are nice and precise, and the jobs are well-paced. I haven’t played enough for this game to fully make a recommendation, but the first few jobs I’ve played are fun enough. And it’s got that jank, if wreaking havoc in the game’s virtual world is what you’re after. Yes, I managed to get an entire 18-wheeler truck to flip like in The Dark Knight, and it’s fun, and I regret nothing.

If you want to try Construction Simulator 2 yourself, you can give it a go! It’s been out since September, and it’s available for 20 US dollars on the Nintendo Switch eShop!


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